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Finding a Clinical Trial

Finding a Clinical Trial

Around the Nation and Worldwide

Three-dimensional world map in blue on a white background.ymgerman/iStock
NIH conducts clinical research trials for many diseases and conditions, including cancerAlzheimer’s diseaseallergy and infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. To search for other diseases and conditions, you can visit ClinicalTrials.gov.
ClinicalTrials.gov [ Tips for finding trials on ClinicalTrials.gov ]
This is a searchable registry and results database of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov gives you information about a trial's purpose, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers for more details. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.

At the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland

Front entrance of the Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center.NIH Clinical Center
Search NIH Clinical Research Studies
The NIH maintains an online database of clinical research studies taking place at its Clinical Center, which is located on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Studies are conducted by most of the institutes and centers across the NIH. The Clinical Center hosts a wide range of studies from rare diseases to chronic health conditions, as well as studies for healthy volunteers. Visitors can search by diagnosis, sign, symptom or other key words.

Join a National Registry of Research Volunteers

ResearchMatchResearchMatch
ResearchMatch(link is external)
This is an NIH-funded initiative to connect 1) people who are trying to find research studies, and 2) researchers seeking people to participate in their studies. It is a free, secure registry to make it easier for the public to volunteer and to become involved in clinical research studies that contribute to improved health in the future.

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