Wednesday, July 25, 2018

HFE gene homeostatic iron regulator & HMBS gene hydroxymethylbilane synthase

The HFE gene provides instructions for producing a protein that is located on the surface of cells, primarily liver and intestinal cells. The HFE protein is also found on some immune system cells.
The HFE protein interacts with other proteins on the cell surface to detect the amount of iron in the body. The HFE protein regulates the production of another protein called hepcidin, which is considered the "master" iron regulatory hormone. Hepcidin is produced by the liver, and it determines how much iron is absorbed from the diet and released from storage sites in the body. When the proteins involved in iron sensing and absorption are functioning properly, iron absorption is tightly regulated. On average, the body absorbs about 10 percent of the iron obtained from the diet.
The HFE protein also interacts with two proteins called transferrin receptors; however, the role of these interactions in iron regulation is unclear.

The HMBS gene provides instructions for making an enzyme known as hydroxymethylbilane synthase. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called heme. Heme is vital for all of the body's organs, although it is most abundant in the blood, bone marrow, and liver. Heme is an essential component of iron-containing proteins called hemoproteins, including hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen in the blood).
The production of heme is a multi-step process that requires eight different enzymes. Hydroxymethylbilane synthase is responsible for the third step in this process, which combines four molecules of porphobilinogen (the product of the second step) to form a compound called hydroxymethylbilane. In subsequent steps, five other enzymes produce and modify compounds that ultimately lead to heme.

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