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PPOX gene protoporphyrinogen oxidase & UROD gene uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase

The PPOX gene provides instructions for making an enzyme known as protoporphyrinogen oxidase. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called heme. Heme is vital for all of the body's organs, although it is most abundant in the blood, bone marrow, and liver. Heme is an essential component of iron-containing proteins called hemoproteins, including hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen in the blood).
The production of heme is a multi-step process that requires eight different enzymes. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase is responsible for the seventh step in this process, in which two hydrogen atoms are removed from protoporphyrinogen IX (the product of the sixth step) to form protoporphyrin IX. In the final step, another enzyme modifies protoporphyrin IX by inserting an iron atom to produce heme.

The UROD gene provides instructions for making an enzyme known as uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called heme. Heme is vital for all of the body's organs, although it is most abundant in the blood, bone marrow, and liver. Heme is an essential component of iron-containing proteins called hemoproteins, including hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen in the blood).
The production of heme is a multi-step process that requires eight different enzymes. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is responsible for the fifth step in this process, in which carbon and oxygen atoms are removed from uroporphyrinogen III (the product of the fourth step) to form coproporphyrinogen III. In subsequent steps, three other enzymes produce and modify compounds that ultimately lead to heme.

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Q & A WITH PORPHYRIA EXPERT, DR. BRUCE WANG, UCSF

Q & A WITH PORPHYRIA EXPERT, DR. BRUCE WANG, UCSF 
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 The following questions were submitted to Dr. Wang for his responses ... Q. Does EPP give us bad teeth? Also, do people with EPP get stomach pains or is that with the other porphyias? A. The porphyrin that accumulates in EPP patients is protoporphyrin IX, which does not cause discoloration to teeth or abdominal pain.
 The type of porphyria that leads to discolored teeth is Congenital Erythropoietic Protoporphyria. The porphyrias that lead to episodic abdominal pain attacks are the acute hepatic porphyrias. Q. I have EPP and I have a severe reaction on my hands and lips. Do I seek urgent care? Also, what can you even do when you burn your lips? A. The acute reactions to sunlight in EPP can be very severe and, unfortunately, there are not many effective options to treat the symptoms. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS such as ibup…