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Porphyria Post

Porphyria Post

The APF is fighting hard for Scenesse to be granted Priority Review status at the FDA. This is the fastest possible review process for a new treatment through the FDA. Scenesse has proven to be an effective treatment with nearly 6,700 worldwide SAFE doses implanted for the treatment of EPP. There IS no current FDA-approved treatment available for this extremely painful phototoxic disease.
As a TEAM we are much more effective.
Please use this Facebook frame to show your support for our cause and to help gain attention to the much needed Priority Review and approval of the EPP treatment Scenesse!

Here is the link to the camera effect.
www.facebook.com/fbcameraeffects/tryit/927609194092504/

Harvoni Study - PCT

Do you have PCT? Are you interested in participating in research? Do you have Hepatitis C? If you answered YES to these questions, this is for you.
We need YOU for a clinical trial!
The purpose of this clinical trial is to assess whether Harvoni alone is an effective therapy in active PCT patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.
Who can participate?
Adult patients with PCT who also have Hepatitis C
If you are interested in participating please contact Edrin Williams, Director of Patient Services at the APF office at 301.347.7166 for additional information.

EPP Clinical Trials – Participants Needed!
Please contact the APF on 866-APF-3635 to request information on these new clinical trials. There are six study sites across the US that need your participation. Do you want a new treatment for EPP? – then come be part of the solution.
There are 4 Sites that are currently accepting patients:
Mount Sinai - New York City, NY
Wake Forest Baptist - Winston Salem, NC
University of Miami - Miami, FL
University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston, TX
Sites to open soon:
University of California San Francisco - San Francisco, CA
University of Utah - Salt Lake City, UT
We need your participation! Contact us today!
Remember…Research is the Key to Your Cure!! Every step along the way is important.

Light the Moment 2018
The Stuhlsatz Family was the recipient of Light the Moment 2018. We are excited to share with you that they are headed to Disney World this week! The Shadow Jumpers team worked very hard to make sure that they have an experience of a lifetime. Stay tuned for more once they return from this exciting trip.

Safe/Unsafe Drug Questionnaire for the Acute Porphyrias (AIP,VP,HCP & ADP)
The APF is collaborating with researchers to identify new safe and unsafe drugs. We need your help. Are you experiencing adverse effects with any of your new medications? If so, please let us know in the questionnaire below how it affected you. We will share these results with our team of renowned Porphyria experts/researchers. They are in the process of updating our safe and unsafe drug list for the acute porphyrias. Your donations will help us educate physicians about the dangerous effects of unsafe drugs. Please click on the link below for the Questionnaire.

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Amazing patient advocacy....and needed media for this issue. Thank you Terri Witter!

Q & A WITH PORPHYRIA EXPERT, DR. BRUCE WANG, UCSF

Q & A WITH PORPHYRIA EXPERT, DR. BRUCE WANG, UCSF 
The APF asked our Facebook friends for their top questions they would ask a porphyria expert.
 The following questions were submitted to Dr. Wang for his responses ... Q. Does EPP give us bad teeth? Also, do people with EPP get stomach pains or is that with the other porphyias? A. The porphyrin that accumulates in EPP patients is protoporphyrin IX, which does not cause discoloration to teeth or abdominal pain.
 The type of porphyria that leads to discolored teeth is Congenital Erythropoietic Protoporphyria. The porphyrias that lead to episodic abdominal pain attacks are the acute hepatic porphyrias. Q. I have EPP and I have a severe reaction on my hands and lips. Do I seek urgent care? Also, what can you even do when you burn your lips? A. The acute reactions to sunlight in EPP can be very severe and, unfortunately, there are not many effective options to treat the symptoms. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS such as ibup…