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Aboute Acute Intermittent Porphyria & Panhematin treatment

What are common signs and symptoms of AIP?

Severe abdominal pain: the most common AIP symptom

The most common symptom of AIP is severe abdominal pain that usually cannot be relieved with pain medicine such as Advil® (ibuprofen) or Tylenol® (acetaminophen). More than 85% of people who develop AIP symptoms have abdominal pain.

Experiencing symptoms is known as having an “AIP attack.” Symptoms may occur for a set period of time, then go away – only to come back later.

Common AIP symptoms

Symptoms can occur in many different areas of your body during an AIP attack. These include:

GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) SYMPTOMS

  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • GASTROINTESTINAL (GI)
  • URINARY SYSTEM
  • BRAIN OR NERVOUS SYSTEM
  • HEART OR BLOOD VESSELS

Early diagnosis and treatment of AIP are critical

AIP attacks can be very serious. And symptoms may get worse over time. Untreated attacks can cause serious damage to your nervous system —including paralysis, and even death. That's why early diagnosis and treatment of AIP is so important.
If you have any of the symptoms listed above, talk to your doctor right away.

What triggers AIP attacks?

  1. Steroid hormones, particularly estrogen and progesterone. These hormones fluctuate the most during the 2 weeks before a woman’s menstrual periods start.
  2. Unhealthy behaviors such as drinking alcohol, smoking, or using illegal drugs.
  3. Stress on the body caused by infections, surgery, or physical exhaustion.
  1. Certain prescription drugs. Attacks can also be triggered by starting a new prescription drug.
  2. Changes in eating patterns such as fasting or crash dieting.
  3. Mental stress or emotional exhaustion.
IF YOU HAVE ATTACKS OF SEVERE ABDOMINAL PAIN OR OTHER SYMPTOMS THAT SEEM TO BE TRIGGERED BY ANY OF THE FACTORS ABOVE, TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY.

What causes AIP?

AIP is caused by a partial lack of an enzyme known as porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). An enzyme is a type of protein that helps to regulate the bodys tissues and organs. Enzymes carry out almost all of the thousands of chemical reactions that take place in cells.
If you have AIP, you have about half of the normal amount of PBGD in your body. This is usually enough for your body to do what it is supposed to do. But triggers like those listed above can upset your body's chemical balance enough to cause symptoms.

Learn about a treatment for repeated acute AIP attacks

COULD IT BE AIP?DOWNLOAD A SYMPTOMS CHECKLISTABOUT PANHEMATINLEARN HOW PANHEMATIN TREATS AIP

TAKE STEPS TO HELP MANAGE YOUR AIP:

  • Try to identify your possible triggers. Then try to reduce or avoid as many as you can. If you continue to experience attacks, keep writing down suspected triggers. Look for patterns of things that occurred right before an attack to identify any changes you can make. Talk to your doctor if you need help.
  • Be careful when changing your eating patterns. If you want to lose weight, get advice from your doctor or nutritionist before starting any diet.
  • Call your doctor at the first sign of an attack. Repeat attacks are often similar. They may start the same way and you may have the same symptoms.
  • Wear a medical alert bracelet. Doctors need to know about your AIP so that they do not prescribe drugs that may make your AIP worse.

DISCLAIMER
This site contains medical information that is intended for residents of the United States only and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by a medical professional. All decisions regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare provider, considering the unique characteristics of the patient. Always consult a physician if you have health concerns. Use and access of this site is subject to the terms and conditions as set out in our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.
Some of the characters depicted are actors and not healthcare professionals or actual patients.

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