Monday, May 13, 2019

101 PCT Porphyria

Porphyria cutanea tarda



Other Names:
 
Porphyria, hepatic
Categories:
 
This disease is grouped under:
 

Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a form of porphyria that primarily affects the skin. People affected by this condition generally experience "photosensitivity," which causes painful, blistering lesions to develop on sun-exposed areas of the skin (i.e. the hands and face). Skin in these areas may also be particularly fragile with blistering and/or peeling after minor trauma. In some cases, increased hair growth as well as darkening and thickening of the affected skin may occur. Liver abnormalities may develop in some people with the condition and PCT, in general, is associated with an increased risk of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.[1][2] In most cases, PCT is a complex or multifactorial condition that is likely associated with the effects of multiple genes in combination with lifestyle and environmental factors. For example, factors such as excess iron, alcohol, estrogens, smoking, chronic hepatitis C, HIV and mutations in the HFE gene (which is associated with the disease hemochromatosis) can all contribute to the development of PCT.[3][1] Less commonly, PCT can run in families (called familial PCT). Familial PCT is caused by changes (mutations) in the UROD gene and is inheritedin an autosomal dominant manner.[4][1] Treatment may include regular phlebotomies (removing a prescribed amount of blood from a vein), certain medications, and/or removal of factors that may trigger the disease.[1][2]
Last updated: 3/8/2016

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.
Showing 24 of 24 | 
Medical TermsOther Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Abnormal blistering of the skin
Blistering, generalized
more  ]
0008066 
Cutaneous photosensitivity
Photosensitive skin
more  ]
0000992 
Erythema0010783 
Hyperpigmentation of the skin
Patchy darkened skin
0000953 
Hypopigmented skin patches
Patchy loss of skin color
0001053 
Skin rash0000988 
Skin vesicle
Blister
0200037 
Thin skin0000963 
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Atypical scarring of skin
Atypical scarring
0000987 
Cerebral palsy0100021 
Cirrhosis
Scar tissue replaces healthy tissue in the liver
0001394 
Edema
Fluid retention
more  ]
0000969 
Generalized hirsutism
Excessive hairiness over body
0002230 
Hepatic steatosis
Fatty infiltration of liver
more  ]
0001397 
Hepatocellular carcinoma0001402 
Sudden cardiac death
Premature sudden cardiac death
0001645 
Percent of people who have these symptoms is not available through HPO
Alopecia
Hair loss
0001596 
Autosomal dominant inheritance0000006 
Autosomal recessive inheritance0000007 
Facial hypertrichosis
Increased facial hair growth
0002219 
Fragile skin
Skin fragility
0001030 
Hyperpigmentation in sun-exposed areas
Increased pigmentation in sun-exposed areas
0005586 
Onycholysis
Detachment of nail
0001806 
Scleroderma0100324 
Showing 24 of 24 | 
Last updated: 5/1/2019

The resources below provide information about treatment options for this condition. If you have questions about which treatment is right for you, talk to your healthcare professional.

Management Guidelines

  • Orphanet Emergency Guidelines is an article which is expert-authored and peer-reviewed that is intended to guide health care professionals in emergency situations involving this condition.  
  • The American Porphyria Foundation offers a document that includes information about porphyria, types, testing, and treatment with Panhematin®.  Click the "document" link above to view these guidelines.

    If you need medical advice, you can look for doctors or other healthcare professionals who have experience with this disease. You may find these specialists through advocacy organizations, clinical trials, or articles published in medical journals. You may also want to contact a university or tertiary medical center in your area, because these centers tend to see more complex cases and have the latest technology and treatments.
    If you can’t find a specialist in your local area, try contacting national or international specialists. They may be able to refer you to someone they know through conferences or research efforts. Some specialists may be willing to consult with you or your local doctors over the phone or by email if you can't travel to them for care.
    You can find more tips in our guide, How to Find a Disease Specialist. We also encourage you to explore the rest of this page to find resources that can help you find specialists.

    Healthcare Resources


      Related diseases are conditions that have similar signs and symptoms. A health care provider may consider these conditions in the table below when making a diagnosis. Please note that the table may not include all the possible conditions related to this disease.
      Conditions with similar signs and symptoms from Orphanet
      Differential diagnosis is mainly variegate porphyria (see this term), diagnosis of which rests on evidence of the characteristic fluorometric peak in plasma.
      Visit the Orphanet disease page for more information.

      Research helps us better understand diseases and can lead to advances in diagnosis and treatment. This section provides resources to help you learn about medical research and ways to get involved.

      Clinical Research Resources

      • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are related to Porphyria cutanea tarda. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies. 

        Please note: Studies listed on the ClinicalTrials.gov website are listed for informational purposes only; being listed does not reflect an endorsement by GARD or the NIH. We strongly recommend that you talk with a trusted healthcare provider before choosing to participate in any clinical study.

        Patient Registry

        • The Porphyrias Consortium is a team of doctors, nurses, research coordinators, and research labs throughout the U.S., working together to improve the lives of people with this condition through research. The Porphyrias Consortium has a registry for patients who wish to be contacted about clinical research opportunities. 

          For more information on the registry see: http://rarediseasesnetwork.epi.usf.edu/registry/index.htm

          Support and advocacy groups can help you connect with other patients and families, and they can provide valuable services. Many develop patient-centered information and are the driving force behind research for better treatments and possible cures. They can direct you to research, resources, and services. Many organizations also have experts who serve as medical advisors or provide lists of doctors/clinics. Visit the group’s website or contact them to learn about the services they offer. Inclusion on this list is not an endorsement by GARD.

          Organizations Supporting this Disease

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